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Caroling in Jackson Square

Caroling in Jackson Square

By Jorge Fuentes

Click aqui para español- >Villancicos en Jackson Square

One of the brightest traditions for the Christmas holidays in New Orleans turns the French Quarter into a huge choir of people who get together to sing the songs of the season illuminated by thousands of candles.

It works like this: The crowds start showing up on the evening of the event at Jackson Square, usually about 10 days before Christmas, and wait for the gates to open. Once there, each person is provided with a free candle and a songbook and after a brief ceremony on a stage in front of the cathedral, the music starts. You do have to be there early ready to wait in line since the singing begins right on time, and the whole thing is over within the hour.

“Imagine a sea of people you just see candles,” said Sandra Dartus, a member of the group that organizes the event. “It’s such a wonderful feeling, a sea of humanity and all these candles, singing and smiling together,” she said.

Patio Planters of The Vieux Carré is the official name of the 350 volunteers who work all year round to raise the funds that cover the cost of the candles, the songbooks, and all of the expenses for security and the logistics that allow from 8 to 10 thousand people each year get together in peace, and this has happened continuously since 1946.

In one of those occasions, with bad weather threatening, the Archbishop at the time offered to host the singing at the cathedral to shelter the crowd and that has been the rain plan for a few times already.

This year, Caroling in Jackson Square is taking place on Sunday, December 16 at 7 pm.

Photo credit Vieuxcarreplanters

Jorge Fuentes

Writer/Escritor

Colors & Note/Colores & Notas

El Salvador

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Publisher's Note

There is an idea that most Latino immigrants who come here lack education, and thus are bound to perform jobs that require more physical abilities than intellectual ones.

The laborers usually receive a negative stigma, even though the United States society requires these types of jobs to function properly. It is important to us to remember there is dignity in any job. 

In our Líders section, we feature Mari Alejos-Puente, an entrepreneur who is succeeding in the cosmetics’ industry. She graduated from Tulane University and Xavier University and she told me how her mother and her grandmother  were part of the cleaning crews at these institutions, respectively, and how proud they were to see her obtain her undergrad and master degrees.

It is a beautiful thing when you know ladies like this mother and grandmother work hard to give a better life to their children. I wanted to mention this as a side note, because it is important to highlight their efforts, just as much as the effort of the highly skilled professionals we are featuring in our cover story.

In our cover we feature three Latin American physicians who are giving individuals a second chance in life with through their commitment and work at the Ochsner Transplant Institute.

Let his note be a reminder that Latinos, in every field, are providing their skills, talent, and sacrifices every day to make the United States a culturally and economically stronger society.

AnaMaria