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“Tell Me What You Eat, and I’ll Tell You Where You’re From.”

“Tell Me What You Eat, and I’ll Tell You Where You’re From.”

By Marcella Escarfuller

Click aqui para español- >"Dime lo que comes y te diré de donde eres"

Everyone knows the old adage: “tell me of the company you keep and I’ll tell you who you are.” This version is just as telling: “tell me of the food you eat and I’ll tell you where you’re from.”

Whether we realize it or not, food defines culture in virtually every corner of the world – and the great U.S. of A. is no different. We associate Wisconsin with cheese, and Maine with lobster. So, naturally, it follows that seasonal food traditions would exist. New England has the clambake – and Louisiana has the crawfish boil.

Spring crawfish boils are as much of a social tradition in Louisiana as summer barbeques are for the rest of the country. In fact, locals love them so much that Louisiana produces an average of 50 tons of crawfish a year. That’s 90% of crawfish consumed in the U.S., 70% of which is consumed in Louisiana. And it’s no wonder – crawfish have been abundant in Louisiana for hundreds of years

There are over 30 species of crawfish, but the crawfish we all know and love, the red crawfish, is native to the Gulf of Mexico’s wetlands and swamps. Its culinary history can be traced back to the Native American tribe of southeast Louisiana, the Chitimacha – skilled farmers, hunters and fishermen who fashioned nets stringed with deer meat to attract and catch crawfish.

 

Today, the crawfish-eating tradition lives on. Local college students host Sunday boils up on the Fly, overlooking the river, with plenty of crawfish and beer to go around. But everyone has their favorite spot. Whether it’s Harbor Seafood & Oyster Bar in Kenner, Captain Sid’s in Bucktown, or Clesi’s in Mid City, there is no shortage of mudbug grubbing options.

Ask anyone on the street and they’ll tell you – the secret is in the seasoning. Some buy special blends from grocery stores or seafood markets, others pride themselves on making their own. And experimenting has never been more popular. Take Ideal Market’s crawfish for example. Their special ingredient? Jalapeños. Even Viet-Cajun crawfish are on the rise: fresh from the boiling pot, crawfish are sautéed in a pan with butter, garlic, and Vietnamese spices, then served hot with corn and potatoes.

Some call it sacrilege, altering the hallowed tradition of the crawfish boil. Others call it creative liberty or artistic license. Honestly, as long as it’s served on newspaper and plastic in the company of friends and family, that’s all it’s really meant to be.

Marcella Escarfuller

Writer/Escritora

NOLA Food

Louisiana / New Orleans

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Publisher's Note

We are beyond excited to feature Amanda Shaw on our June cover!

We love everything Amanda represents. Not many people are aware of her Latin heritage, and it’s hard to know about it from seeing her performances on stage and to see her love and amazing showcase of Louisiana’s music. So, it’s hard to imagine someone who is such a Louisiana icon grew up partaking in Guatemalan cultural traditions.

Featuring Amanda Shaw on Viva NOLA is a dream come true! It is individuals like her who represent exactly what we are trying to convey.

We are part of and love Louisiana. We enjoy its culture while also embracing our Latin heritage. We utilize our talents and skills to contribute to making our home a better place, and we serve as ambassadors of this region wherever we go.

This is what VIVA NOLA Magazine celebrates--a connection of cultures and communities. And who better than Amanda Shaw to perfectly tell the story of many of us who call New Orleans and Louisiana home.

Thank you, Amanda for opening your heart and sharing your story with us. You definitely make us proud!

AnaMaria