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YOCHO Band

YOCHO Band The New Orleans’ Salseros 

By Jorge Fuentes 

Click aqui para español- >YOCHO

The creation of the salsa band Yocho took place in New Orleans like many things tend to happen around here: by coincidence.

Th e band was formed two years ago by a group of friends who are all fans of Latin music. Some of its members had visited Colombia recently and had discovered salsa music, so they decided to form a band to expand their love for this genre. All seven members use an alias name, which is interesting. Their founder, who goes by Gigante, says that once they realized they had a strong interest in common, putting the band together resulted very organically.

The peculiar name for the band comes from the counting of times, in Spanish, before the music starts (and one, and two, and three), or something like that. They prefer to leave that name, and their own names, in the murkiness of legend.

What we know clearly is their love for playing and creating music from their own point of view, but without getting too far from the established patterns. And the dancing public supports them, since they have fans who follow them faithfully each time they play live.

During a recent radio interview, they presented their first original song, titled “Marisma,” in which, according to Grillo the vocalist, “we try to illustrate the tension in love before the moments of tenderness.” But it’s not a tender song, it’s rather a rush of energy typical of young age.

Their immediate plans include several gigs around the city and a festival in June. Yocho wants to keep on playing and creating music that brings joy to people. 

More information about Yocho Band is available on their Facebook page at facebook.com/yochoband

Jorge Fuentes

Writer/Escritor

Colors & Note/Colores & Notas

El Salvador

More in this category: « Los Cenzontles Margie Perez »

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Publisher's Note

There is an idea that most Latino immigrants who come here lack education, and thus are bound to perform jobs that require more physical abilities than intellectual ones.

The laborers usually receive a negative stigma, even though the United States society requires these types of jobs to function properly. It is important to us to remember there is dignity in any job. 

In our Líders section, we feature Mari Alejos-Puente, an entrepreneur who is succeeding in the cosmetics’ industry. She graduated from Tulane University and Xavier University and she told me how her mother and her grandmother  were part of the cleaning crews at these institutions, respectively, and how proud they were to see her obtain her undergrad and master degrees.

It is a beautiful thing when you know ladies like this mother and grandmother work hard to give a better life to their children. I wanted to mention this as a side note, because it is important to highlight their efforts, just as much as the effort of the highly skilled professionals we are featuring in our cover story.

In our cover we feature three Latin American physicians who are giving individuals a second chance in life with through their commitment and work at the Ochsner Transplant Institute.

Let his note be a reminder that Latinos, in every field, are providing their skills, talent, and sacrifices every day to make the United States a culturally and economically stronger society.

AnaMaria