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Sugary Sweet - Treat Yourself Without the Guilt

Sugary Sweet - Treat Yourself Without the Guilt
By Lia Threat @wellnesswithlia

Click aqui para español- >Antojos dulces - Un gusto sin culpa.

May brings with it all the indulgences: festival grub, snowballs, ice cream, and sweet treats. How does one keep their sugar consumption in check with all the temptation?

To reduce daily sugar consumption, run down this mental list of questions:


1. HAVE I ALREADY INDULGED IN SOMETHING SWEET TODAY?

2. HAVE I EATEN OR AM I THIRSTY?

3. AM I TIRED AND SEEKING AN ENERGY BOOST?

4. CAN THIS TREAT BE MODIFIED TO DECREASE THE SUGAR CONTENT?

5. IS MY CRAVING RELATED TO HOW I AM FEELING?

6. IS THERE A HEALTHIER ALTERNATIVE?

Sugar comes in many forms- it is usually added to food under the guise of other names such as brown rice syrup, corn syrup, fruit juice concentrate, dextrose, and sucrose. Th ere are more than 50 names for various forms of sugar!

Becoming familiar with the most common names will help you scan food labels before buying.

Beware! If a product lists a form of sugar as the first or second ingredient, it is likely very high in sugar per serving. Food labels list ingredients from largest to smallest so look before buying. To avoid excess sugar, keep homemade treats on hand that are naturally sweetened.

Try this frozen yogurt popsicle recipe:


• 6-8 oz container of plain, unsweetened yogurt
• 2 ripe mangos cubed or 1 1/2 cup berries
• Splash of coconut milk to thin
• (Optional) fresh mint, Stevia, or honey
• Blend, pour in popsicle molds and freeze
• Enjoy!

Lia Threat

Writer/Escritora

Wellness

Louisiana

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Publisher's Note

There is an idea that most Latino immigrants who come here lack education, and thus are bound to perform jobs that require more physical abilities than intellectual ones.

The laborers usually receive a negative stigma, even though the United States society requires these types of jobs to function properly. It is important to us to remember there is dignity in any job. 

In our Líders section, we feature Mari Alejos-Puente, an entrepreneur who is succeeding in the cosmetics’ industry. She graduated from Tulane University and Xavier University and she told me how her mother and her grandmother  were part of the cleaning crews at these institutions, respectively, and how proud they were to see her obtain her undergrad and master degrees.

It is a beautiful thing when you know ladies like this mother and grandmother work hard to give a better life to their children. I wanted to mention this as a side note, because it is important to highlight their efforts, just as much as the effort of the highly skilled professionals we are featuring in our cover story.

In our cover we feature three Latin American physicians who are giving individuals a second chance in life with through their commitment and work at the Ochsner Transplant Institute.

Let his note be a reminder that Latinos, in every field, are providing their skills, talent, and sacrifices every day to make the United States a culturally and economically stronger society.

AnaMaria